Stuff to Do

AllNY.com's look at things to do in NYC written by New Yorkers for New Yorkers and serious New York tourists.


October is Apple and Pumpkin Time at These Area Farms

The dog days of summer are finally over – it’s October apple and pumpkin time. Foliage seekers may want to schedule road trips to look at the brilliant mosaic of colors adorning the maples and oaks, but for the family, October is the time for pumpkin patches, corn mazes, apple picking and hayrides.

NEW YORK CITY

New York City’s boroughs have some intriguing farm experiences.

Courtesy Queens Country Farm Museum

The historic Queens Country Farm Museum in Floral Park, Queens offers weekend activities throughout October. The farm, owned by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, dates back to 1697 and occupies New York City’s largest remaining tract of undisturbed farmland. Plan a visit to go pumpkin picking or navigate a maze, or hop on a hayride. Start your ad venture with a Stalk Talk to prepare you for the challenge of finding clues, solving puzzles and mazing your way to Victory Bridge where the view of the three-acre Amazing Maize Maze is revealed.  For even more of a challenge, try the Maze by Moonlight on October 15, 20, 22 or 27 from 6:30pm-7:30pm or 7:30pm-9:30pm.

73-50 Little Neck Parkway, Queens; 718-347-3276 www.queensfarm.org

Courtesy Decker Farm

An officially designated historic landmark, Decker Farm in Springville, Staten Island is New York City’s oldest continuously working family-style farm. 220 years young, the farm is a joy to visit during October with hayrides for the family that meander past costumed artisans performing 19th-century trades. For those willing to try some new-fangled activities, the farm lets you sign up for three tries of pumpkin chucking.  Or take the little ones on a trek through the Children’s Hay Maze, made entirely of hay bales. Everyone can take their newly picked pumpkins to the painting station to decorate, too. Pumpkin picking is available every Saturday and Sunday in October, and on Monday, October 10.

435 Richmond Hill Road, Staten Island, 917-887-0482 https://www.historicrichmondtown.org/deckerfarm

LONG ISLAND

Courtesy Harbes Family Farm

The North Fork of Long Island offers the ultimate family destination with Harbes Family Farm. Just an hour and half from New York City, the Mattituck farm treats you to its beloved Barnyard Adventure area with scenic hayrides, Goat Mountain slides, a super silo obstacle course, jumbo jumper bounce pillows, a gnome-themed hedge maze and playgrounds.. Weekend activities add pig races. After the farm fun, stop at the Mattituck Farmstand for cider donuts and other farm-fresh produce, or at Harbes Vineyard for a wine tasting in their rustic Wine Barn or sit-down service in their scenic courtyard.

715 Sound Ave, Mattituck, NY; 631-298-0800 www.harbesfamilyfarm.com

You can skip the traffic snarls of the North Fork by heading South to the Hamptons on the East End of Long Island.

Courtesy Corwiths Farmstand

At Corwiths Farmstand in Water Mill, you can do the U-pick pumpkin thing and relax for a while the kids slide down the wooden slides, play a game on the giant Connect 4 in the field or climb on the wooden castles and trains. There are also barrel train rides, hayrides, barnyard animal feeding and a racetrack for pedal carts.  Still not enough to keep everyone busy? If you’ve had your fill of everything pumpkin and gourd, this is also the place for goat yoga, even more beautiful now against a backdrop of haystacks and pumpkins.

851 Head of Pond Rd, Water Mill, NY www.corwithsfarmstand.com

Courtesy Hank’s Pumpkin Town

Water Mill is also where you’ll find expansive Hank’s PumpkinTown. You’ll know it immediately by the cars parked on either side of the road. It’s open daily and no reservations are required so be prepared for crowds and waits. You’ll find the usual family-friendly activities here: pumpkin picking, corn mazes, wagon rides, train rides, and giant slides for the kids. After all that fun, your reward is Hank’s yummy Fall for Y’All hot apple cider topped with whipped cream, a caramel drizzle, and an apple cider donut, served in a take-home souvenir mug. If you prefer to pick your own apples, you can do that on weekends.

249 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, NY; www.hankspumpkintown.com

NEW JERSEY

Two farms in Morris County, New Jersey offer scenic pick-your-own experiences, a mere 80-minute drive from New York City.

Courtesy Riamede Farm

At New Jersey’s oldest pick-your-own apple orchard, Riamede Farm, you can begin your visit with Storytime at the Farm, the reading of a harvest-related story, followed by apple picking. On October 12 the farm holds its Community Barn Dance where you’ll learn the rudiments of square dancing, accompanied by traditional music. Make it a date evening, and bring a blanket or chairs plus your favorite beverage for a BBQ dinner picnic on the lawn.  The farm’s cider donuts make the perfect dessert.

122 Oakdale Road, Chester, NJ; 908-879-5353 www.riamede.com

Courtesy Alstede Farms

A second farm in Chester, Alstede Farms provides a souvenir container with a PYO entry ticket. Each participant must have a ticket which includes the apple picking event plus scenic hay rides around the farm, access to the hay pyramid and the farm’s popular evergreen maze.  Book tickets in advance online.

1 Alstede Farms Lane, Chester, NJ; 908-879-7189 www.alstedefarms.com

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Bring the Kids to the New “My Gym” Open House on October 3 in Park Slope, Brooklyn

Are you looking for somewhere to give your kids a chance to play and develop skills at the same time? The award-winning My Gym Children’s Fitness Center, (“My Gym”), invites parents, caregivers and their children to My Gym Park Slope’s new location at 808 Union Street, 2nd floor on Monday, October 3, from 9am to 6:10pm. There, all will experience My Gym programming, tour the brand-new facilities, and meet the staff.

Courtesy My Gym Children’s Fitness Center

Six 45-minute sessions are offered with supervised activities that are age-appropriate. The Open House sessions will include adventure activities, circle time, skill stations, games, puppet shows, and the use of gym equipment and toys. Spots for each time period are limited and pre-registration is required.  Sign up here: https://www.mygym.com/parkslope/events.

Courtesy My Gym Children’s Fitness Center

Popular My Gym Park Slope, Brooklyn, is a state-of-the-art children’s facility with innovative physical early learning programs for children ages 3 months through 10 years. Featuring pre-gymnastics, games, music, rides, sports, puppet shows and more, My Gym helps children develop cognitive skills, confidence, socialization, independence and the positive self-image needed for school… all while they have FUN! Classes run 50 minutes for the younger ages and one hour for older children. On weekends, My Gym offers unique and exciting birthday parties, individually tailored around each birthday child to make them the “star of the day.” My Gym follows New York State safety protocols to ensure a healthful, safe experience for all. Masks are highly suggested but are not required at this time. Detailed health, cleanliness and safety protocols can be found here.

Event detail:

What

Courtesy My Gym Children’s Fitness Center

Open House celebration with 45-minute sessions starting at 9am through 6:10pm. The free Open House welcomes parents and their children, ages 6 months – 10 years old, to enjoy a program of supervised gym activities on My Gym equipment with songs, dance, games and toys. Each session is limited to a maximum of 25 children.

When

Monday, October 3

Sessions are scheduled from 9:00-9:45, 10:00-10:45, 11:00-11:45. 3:25-4:10, 4:25-5:10 and 5:25-6:10pm.

Reservations:   https://www.mygym.com/parkslope/events

Where

My Gym Park Slope, 808 Union Street, 2nd floor, Brooklyn, 718-788-2200,  https://www.mygym.com/parkslope/parkslope@mygym.com

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Where to Get the Best Waterfront Dining in New York City

City dwellers love dining with a waterside view. Here are five exceptional choices to catch a breeze and enjoy a great meal.

The Fulton

The Fulton © Meryl Pearlstein

Jean-Georges Vongerichten has captured the heart of the Seaport with his multi-story, multi-room dining emporium The Fulton. At the Chef’s first seafood restaurant, the downstairs dining area features an open-air setting and outdoor patio seating, all with fabulous views of the Brooklyn Bridge and Brooklyn.

The Fulton © Meryl Pearlstein

The most popular room is on the second floor where diners feel like they’re sitting right on the East River with waves lapping at their feet. If you plan ahead, you can also book one of the private rooks set with its own banquette and chairs for a two-sided waterfront affair. The seafood (and meat) menu updates by season with some recent specials including a roasted Mediterranean turbot, presented whole and fileted tableside for a deft extraction of the delicate white meat.

The Fulton © Meryl Pearlstein

Served with a side of heat-packing chili oil and shallots, the seasonal fish is a most appropriate choice for the location. Other specials – order them when they’re available – include uni from California, a full raw bar with seasonal East coast oysters, and roasted summer carrots with an herbaceous basil pistou and tarragon. Add a touch of whimsy to your meal with a strawberry plant pot dessert to fish.

The Fulton © Meryl Pearlstein

The entire creation, a strawberry rhubarb smush topped with chocolate crumble and filling an edible flower pot with an edible flower as garnish, is a fun share to finish your meal.

Island Oyster

Courtesy Island Oyster

A secret to many, Manhattan island has its own satellite island with its own island culture, Governors Island. Sitting between Manhattan and Brooklyn, the island is a gem for parks, picnics and staying cool on a sweltering city day. Here, the seasonal Island Oyster is a casual open-air hangout for bivalves and other seafood while offering an in-city island holiday. Try the blue-toned rummy Permanent Vacation — it’ll definitely put you in a Jimmy Buffett frame of mind. Prepare to get wet, as tables are so close to the water that waves often crash onto diners. For even more fun, there’s ping pong, live music and a kids’ menu. To get to Governors Island, grab a ferry just north of the Staten Island ferry terminal. Stand to the right side and you’ll get close-up views of the Statue of Liberty and

Grand Banks

Courtesy Grand Banks

A wooden schooner-turned-restaurant and bar, Grand Banks is a former fishing vessel (the Sherman Zwicker) beautifully appointed with yellow-and-white sails at Pier 25 in TriBeCa. Views are guaranteed here, but you’ll have to decide which way to face: towards the Hudson River and the New Jersey skyline or towards Downtown Manhattan where One World Trade Center and the cityscape present a photographic background like no other. Menu highlights by Chef Kerry Heffernan are seared sea scallops with sweet corn succotash and coriander, and a lobster roll dressed with fennel, lemon and dulse emulsion. A delicious dessert, key lime mousse keeps the summer spirit going as does the Revolución, a summer-light libation of rum, mint, lime and bitters. Plan to visit during a weekday, if possible, as the post-work bar scene and weekend crowds create long lines to get on board.  If the perfect waterfront sunset is on your bucket list, consider the rooftop at City Vineyard instead, one pier north. The views are equally stunning and you can try one of City Winery’s eight vintages on tap.

Pilot

Courtesy Pilot

For a similar experience, if you’re in Brooklyn, head to Brooklyn Bridge Park to Pier 6 where Pilot sits. A pilot boat-turned oyster bar and restaurant, the beautiful schooner opens on a seasonal basis for seafood-oriented dining on the water.  Pilot shares the same menu as Grand Banks but offers a striking view of the Manhattan skyline and the East River. Come early – like Grand Banks, lines form quickly on beautiful days.

The River Café

Courtesy The River Café

For a fine dining experience in Brooklyn, The River Café in DUMBO has commanded the city’s waterside dining scene for 45 years. Here, venue and views match the caliber of food and service. The beloved restaurant’s very specific dress code adds to the specialness of the experience, and diners reserve well in advance for a waterside table with stunning views of the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges and the East River. The prix fixe menu is fine dining at its loftiest with starters including caviar and foie gras, followed by rack of lamb, butter-poached Nova Scotia lobster, or duck breast. While desserts vary, you can expect the likes of soufflés and other seasonal creations. A Madeira dessert flight is paired with petite sweets for an extra treat. The restaurant sits on an underwater pier and, while stationary, you’ll clearly have the sense that you’re dining right on the water. After acknowledging the tuxedoed doorman who welcomes you, be sure to look around the entry ramp where oversized flower arrangements and seafaring memorabilia make you feel like you’ve just boarded a private yacht. The River Café is open for dinner Wednesday through Sunday.

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The Karpovsky Variations: A Brilliant, Engaging and Haunting Study in Family Relations

Playing through the end of the month, Adam Kraar’s is a study in family relations. The off-Broadway play makes its world premiere courtesy of Boomerang Theatre Company.

Courtesy Boomerang Theatre Company

Julia Karpovsky’s father Lawrence is brilliant and talented. Living away from his family, somewhere across the globe, with his daughter Julia and a very absent mother, he is always on a plane or smoking a pipe to seemingly hide from something, Laurence is struggling with his wife and also having difficulty establishing a relationship with Julia. His brothers, Barry and Harold, live in the US and have welcomed Julia into their complicated lives as she moves to the United States for school.

Photo by Isaiah Tanenbaum Theatrica

Growing up among her eccentric and disparate relatives, Julia navigates her way through a family with a missing piece and a father who has walked back from his musicality to a life of running from country to country as a journalist. She, herself, is trying to find herself as a musician, linking her clarinet play to elusive notes connected with Jewish melodies that she heard her father play when she was a child. We see her evolve from a child to an adolescent all in the opening scene, leading to her transformation as a “wandering Jew,” unsure of how she fits in.

Photo by Isaiah Tanenbaum Theatrica

The play runs for 120 minutes with a short 10-minute intermission and switches back and forth in time periods, not unlike many of our favorite television shows today such as This Is Us. The matriarch of the family, Great Momma Rose, appears both in real time and in after-death flashbacks as a symbol of what the Karpovsky family was and could be in different times. A fascinating glimpse into the search for connection with people and through music, the play traces the Karpovskys’ encounters at airport lounges over two decades as they improvise what it means to be a family, bringing kugel to share along with tales of disappointments and problems.

Playwright Adam Kraar creates stories about cross-cultural clashes and connections, including works about American families in Asia, the Civil Rights Movement, and quixotic rebels who challenge societal boundaries. Adam’s plays have been developed and/or produced at Primary Stages, The Public Theatre, Theater for the New City, Theatreworks U.S.A., The New Group, N.Y. Theatre Workshop, Cherry Lane, LaMama, Stella Adler Studio, Geva Theatre, and many others.

The talented ensemble includes:

Photo by Isaiah Tanenbaum Theatrica

Ezra Barnes as Lawrence Karpovsky has performed in many off-Broadway shows including Queen, Breakfast with Mugabe, Transparent Falsehood, To Kill a Mockingbird in White, America English Bride, The Miser and Richard II.

Photo by Isaiah Tanenbaum Theatrica

Like her character Julia Karpovsky, Rivka Borek is a third culture kid, growing up in Hong Kong and London before moving to America at 15. She has been seen in Off-Broadway in Love’s Labour’s Lost and in regional productions including Hamlet; Sense and Sensibility, Oh Gastronomy! , Shrew, and Romeo and Juliet.

Photo by Isaiah Tanenbaum Theatrica

Barbara Broughton, Great Momma Rose, is familiar to New York theater audiences from Sunday in The Park with George and Music Music on Broadway and off-Broadway in Grey Gardens and A Little Night Music.

Photo by Isaiah Tanenbaum Theatrica

J. Anthony Crane, Barry Karpovsky, has played in NYC on Broadway in The Country House, Sight Unseen, Butley and The Winslow Boy and is familiar from TV’s Succession.

Photo by Isaiah Tanenbaum Theatrica

Michelle Liu Coughlin, Maxine, is an actress, singer, and producer. Michelle toured with Lincoln Center’s Tony-winning revival of The King and I and has worked extensively in New York and regional theatre including City Center, Playwrights Horizons, and York Theatre.

Photo by Isaiah Tanenbaum Theatrica

Chris Thorn plays Harold Karpovsky and has been seen on Broadway in Bernhardt/Hamlet and Off-Broadway in Pride and Prejudice and Twelfth Night.

Tickets are available at Boomerang Theatre Company Presents: The Karpovsky Variations – Events (onthestage.tickets) with the last performance scheduled for Sunday, May 29 at The Jeffrey and Paula Gural Theatre at A.R.T./NY , 502 West 53rd Street, New York, New York.

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The Parrish Art Museum Welcomes Summer with a Host of Events and New Exhibits

If you missed the Parrish Art Museum’s exclusive Spring Fling event this month, don’t fret, there’s much more to come from Southampton’s beautiful art museum.

Two Forks & a Cork Courtesy Parrish Art Museum

Resuming with the May 14, Two Forks & a Cork event, patrons can enjoy tastings of dishes from some of The East End’s best food purveyors and restaurants along with wines and spirits from seven North Fork and Hamptons vineyards. Participating restaurants include Lunch, Golden Pear and The Cheese Shoppe. Vineyards showing off their new releases along with their classics include RG l NY, Macari, Channing Daughters, Kontakosta, Paumanok and Palmer. Twin Sills Moonshine will provide a spicy note to the evening with live jazz music by a live jazz for this favorite, convivial event, happily back in person this season. More information is available at parrishart.org.

Two new exhibits are planned for the summer:

Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018 © Gary Mamay

Through July 11, Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018 shows some 90 works by the renowned American painter and graphic artist over six decades of printmaking. The exhibit highlights the artist’s experiments with familiar, abstract and personal imagery and honors the artist’s 91st birthday. Structured in four thematic sections, this survey features pieces in intaglio, lithography, woodcut, linoleum cut, screen printing, and lead relief. The exhibition shows the artist’s revision and recycling of key motifs familiar in his oeuvres: the American flag, numerals and the alphabet.

The museum is also showing a film with a talk about Jasper Johns on June 17.

Leilah Babirye Nakatiiti from the Kuchu Grasshopper Clan - Courtesy Parrish Art Museum

Opening May 22 and showing through July 24, Set It Off brings together six artists whose works engage the monumental, the site-specific, or the immersive. The exhibit is curated by Racquel Chevremont and Mickalene Thomas, know together as Deux Femmes Noires. The exhibit brings together work by Leilah Babirye, Torkwase Dyson, February James, Karyn Olivier, Kameelah Janan Rasheed, and Kennedy Yanko. The works shown often combine multiple elements of paintings, sculpture, installation, sound, and language.

Other events:

On June 11 and 21, the museum will feature a garden design symposium, Landscape Pleasures, with exclusive tours of Hamptons Gardens.

Detail of Jennifer Bartlett, At Sands Point #16, 1985-1986 Courtesy Parrish Art Museum

If you join the museum, you’re always guaranteed free admission with priority status for previews and tours of exhibits.

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Ways to Honor New York City’s Asian-American Community During Asian-American Pacific Islander Heritage Month

This month honors the achievements of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States and recognizes the struggles from the pandemic and the overt demonstrations of hatred and anti-Asian sentiment that have plagued the AAPI community.

You can start by showing your support by frequenting the Asian and Pacific communities in New York City and helping their businesses stay alive: Chinatown in Manhattan, Chinatown in Sunset Park in Brooklyn, Chinatown in Flushing in Queens, and Koreatown in Manhattan, for example. That’s a very good beginning – these neighborhoods have a high concentration of AAPI businesses with a myriad of restaurants, shops and more, all ready to give you an immersive Asian experience with authenticity.

Chinatown © Lee Snider

Outside of these areas, there are many options in other parts of the city where you can also partake in the AAPI experience. Show your support of NYC’s rich “melting pot” by patronizing local businesses and cultural events and volunteering to help those in need.

Let’s recognize the history, culture and achievements of this community and make a statement that shows our unity.

Support the Arts

Courtesy New York Public Library

The New York Public Library is celebrating the month with storytelling, movies, origami classes, online book discussions and age-appropriate curated reading lists.

Eva Chen at 92Y © Michael Priest Photography

The 92nd Street Y shares a selection of archived free talks and new online and in-person events featuring luminaries from the worlds of culture, politics, activism and literature. Notable on the schedule are online programs from Helen Kim and Noah Leavitt, authors of Jewasian about America’s newest Jews; and a both online and in-person conversation with Eric Kim about what it means to be Korean-American.

Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company © Andy Chiang

Blending Chinese traditional and American modern dance, New Jersey-based Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company was founded by late Taiwanese choreographer Nai-Ni. Tickets for the May 21 performance celebrating the legacy of Nai-Ni Chen and “The Year of the Water Tiger” at New Jersey Performing Arts Center are available at Ticketmaster for the Victoria Theater Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Stage.

NuWorks Courtesy Pan Asian Repertory Theatre

Currently completing performances of “Citizen Wong,” a new play inspired by the life and times of U.S. Gilded Age social rights activities Wong Chin Foo, the 45-year-old Pan Asian Repertory Theatre is a member of the National Asian Artists Project which promotes access for Asian American artists. Starting in June, the company’s “NuWorks” is an experimental series of self-created works from innovative artists, exploring an eclectic range of genres and techniques using poetry, text, dance and music.

Support the Businesses that Reflect and Help the Communities

Courtesy Ginseng Museum Café

Part museum, part shop and part café, the newly opened Ginseng Museum Café in Koreatown introduces guests to the thousand-year history and efficacy of South Korean ginseng through immersive digital animations. For refreshment, the café menu includes Korean red ginseng products by CheongKwanJang with reenergizing draft 24-hour fresh-brewed pure ginseng extract, honey ginseng tea, pure extract latte and ginseng ginger tea.

Chinatown Night Market Courtesy thinkchinatown.org

Think! Chinatown, a community-based organization that supports and amplifies the voices of Asians in New York City, provides information about events like the Chinatown Night Market on May 20 and more.

Courtesy Hotel Kitano

The only Japanese-owned boutique hotel in NYC, Hotel Kitano is a beautiful if understated example of Asian style.

Courtesy Mansa Tea

Mansa Tea, offering brews from both China and South Korea, has increased awareness of tea culture at many of the city’s fine dining establishments including Per Se and the Baccarat Hotel and now through virtual tea workshops and tea sales.

Eat Out for a Good Cause

Support the restaurants and food providers that contribute so much to the fabric of NYC’s culinary landscape. From Chinatown to Uptown, small to large, casual to fine dining, every meal that you buy is a sign of support.

Mifune © Meryl Pearlstein

Make your Sunday night Chinese dinner a Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday event as well, dining outdoors or indoors at Chinatown’s 102-year-old Nom Wah Tea Parlor; or enjoy dinner with a group or in a private dining room at Michelin-starred Jungsik (modern Korean) in Tribeca and Mifune (Japanese Washoku cuisine) in Midtown.

NR (‘N Roll) © Zenith Richards

Not-so-hidden Upper East Side speakeasy-restaurant, NR (‘N Roll), is the brainchild of owner and bar director Shigefumi Kabashima from Kyushu, Japan. NR offers a contemporary twist on the restaurants found in traditional Japanese port towns during the Meiji Period, serving ramen, oysters and light bites with fantastical cocktails. For an uptown Asian experience, Shige also runs ROKC (Ramen Oysters Kitchen and Cocktails) in Hamilton Heights.

Courtesy Mochidoki

After years of having their mochi ice cream creations displayed on dessert menus at Tao, Nobu and other top Asian restaurants, Mochidoki now has two brick-and-mortar locations, one in SoHo and a second on the Upper East Side. Also in SoHo with a second location in Chelsea, Japanese-owned Harbs mesmerizes with tea, coffee, and original cakes that qualify as works of art.

Courtesy Chai

Opened during the pandemic in September 2021, Chai serves authentic Beijing cuisine, inheriting cooking techniques of the court cuisine of the Qing Dynasty including Peking roast duck, Zha Jiang noodles, Aiwowo and more.

Courtesy Four Four South Village

Taiwanese specialist Four Four South Village added a fourth location in Manhattan during the pandemic as well, with original sites in Flushing, Queens and the East Village. Four Four is named after Taiwan’s first military dependent’s village and serves signature Taiwanese beef noodles, a delicacy that originated from these villages, along with a full menu.

Courtesy Natsumi

Woman-owned, popular Times Square Natsumi features a Japanese-Italian fusion menu with sushi, infused sakes and modern Japanese fare in a sleek venue well-located for pre-theater dining.

Bar Goto © Daniel Krieger

Kenta Goto invites you to two casual bar-restaurants that bear his name, Bar Goto on the Lower East Side and Bar Goto Niban in Brooklyn. Born and raised in Tokyo, Goto is an acclaimed cocktail master, showcasing his talent for creating unusual drinks in these two izakayas. Bar Goto is one of the first Japanese-American crossover bars – melding precise Japanese execution and Asian ingredients with American bartending techniques.

Shop and Support

You can support the AAPI community and at-risk workers by patronizing their various businesses that add to the cultural fabric of the city.

Courtesy Sunrise Mart

Two notable markets in New York and New Jersey will improve your awareness of the Asian community. Sunrise Mart sells all things Asian from skincare to fruit and seafood at Japan Village in Industry City, Brooklyn, and in various locations in Manhattan. The enormous Mitsuwa Marketplace market in Edgewater, NJ is a mix of Japanese grocery store, food court and pharmacy.

Courtesy Emmelle Boutique

Uniqlo, the go-to for reasonably priced outerwear, has its roots in Japan and a flagship store on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. If you’d prefer something more bespoke, Emmelle Boutique on Madison Avenue has been a standout among women’s shops since 1982. Founded by Korean-American fashion designer Mi Jong Lee, the store features the Emmelle and Mi Jong Lee collections as well as select lines from both established and emerging designers. Designing out of a tiny studio in New York, Japanese-American Trisha Okubo creates the popular selection of earrings known as the Ear Bar for Maison Miru. Beautiful eveningwear from fashion designer Tadashi Shoji from Sendai, Japan is available online and at Anthropologie.

Learning Is Understanding

Even more important today, AAPI organizations offer online and in-person learning that fosters cooperation and understanding among countries.

Courtesy Japan Society

Robust scheduling from Asia Society includes discussions, performances and family programming with a multi-cultural emphasis. Japan Society offers year-round events dedicated to Japanese art, theater, film, language and culture. Zoom classes in Mandarin language and Chinese culture are offered by China Institute.

Volunteer to Make a Difference

In additional to national organizations like Stop AAPI Hate, there are numerous NYC-centric ones with a mission of supporting AAPI-owned businesses and protecting Asian Americans.

Courtesy Protect Chinatown

Sign up for the newsletter from Welcome to Chinatown for news and a resource guide to help preserve NYC’s Chinatowns. Think! Chinatown welcomes all volunteers to assist with projects helping the Asian community. Show your conviction at Protect Chinatown where you can volunteer to help those suffering from both the pandemic and hatred against the community. Through Heart of Dinner, you can deliver care packages or meals to Asian elders in need, while also supporting local food providers.

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